IV International Conference
October 20-22, 2022
Academic Science Communication: Teaching Non-Native English Speaking Scholars in a Multidisciplinary, Multicultural Context
The conference will address the following questions
Q1
How might immersion into real-life professional contexts affect learners’ motivation to collaborate at the intersection of diverse scientific disciplines?
Q2
What constitutes effective scholarly scientific communication?
Q3
How do learners with different levels of language competence effectively communicate with one another to exchange ideas?
Q4
How might hybrid teaching/learning relate to real-life scholarly communication scenarios and thereby enhance potential learning opportunities?
Q5
What new classroom technologies, strategies, and knowledges might be leveraged to the direct benefit of NNES scholarly communication across the sciences?
Q6
How might educators best support and academically socialize NNES in the area of scholarly communication across scientific disciplines?
Q7
How can faculty and students be encouraged to collaborate across the disciplines in an effort to ameliorate scientific scholarly communication?
Q8
What are the inherent opportunities and challenges to teaching scholarly communication to NNES in multidisciplinary, multicultural contexts?
The transformation of science from monodisciplinary to multidisciplinary has led to profound changes in both the forms and the methods of teaching academic science communication for non-native English speakers (NNES). This topic is of particular salience in non-anglophone educational settings where the pressure to publish and present research in English is intense. Even in light of some increases in multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary work, colleges and universities often remain ‘siloed’ along disciplinary lines such that faculty from different disciplines rarely interact, and students take most of their courses within the discipline of their declared major. To make matters more challenging, due at least in part to its multi-faceted nature, scholarly communication is rarely taught as a distinct academic discipline.

This conference aims to define methodological approaches to teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) research writing and speaking across multiple disciplinary and cultural contexts. It subsequently attempts to support the scholarly communication proficiency of NNES who must communicate science, including multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary science, to diverse audiences.
Call for papers

Dear authors,


We would be happy to publish your papers in the Conference Proceedings. The Editorial Board has developed these Guidelines to help you. Please read the Guidelines carefully and follow them to avoid rejection.

We select papers for publication basing on double-blind peer-reviewing. The reviewers advise on publishing or rejecting a paper in accordance with a set of criteria. The papers are not proofread or edited by the Editorial Board; this is seen as the responsibility of the author.

We look forward to your participation in the conference.

Conference Proceedings: Writer’s Guidelines


Editorial Board

Speakers
Elena Bazanova
PhD, President of the Association "National Writing Centres Consortium", director of the NUST MISIS Academic Writing Office, director of Language Training and Testing Center (LTTC),
read more
Angela Dadak
PhD, Old Dominion University
MA in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), Monterey Institute of International Studies
BA in Russian Area Studies, Dartmouth College,
read more
Betsy Gilliland
PhD, Associate professor in the department of Second Language Studies, University of Hawaiʻi Mānoa, read more
Nadežda Stojković
PhD, Faculty of Electronic Engineering, University of Niš, Serbia, read more
Amanda Wegner
PhD student, proofreader in the Academic Writing Office, South Ural State University,
read more
Christine Feak
PhD, Lecturer, ELI 994 Coordinator, Cornell University, USA,
read more
Evgeniya Khabirova
Candidate of Science in Philology. Head of the Academic Writing Office, Associate Professor at the Department of Foreign Languages, South Ural State University,
read more
Irina Korotkina
PhD (Doctor of Education), Director of Academic Writing and Communication Center, RANEPA; Dean of Interdisciplinary Department of English, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences; Professor of Global Education Department, Institute for Strategy of Education Development of the Russian Academy of Education
Elizaveta Gromova
PhD in law, Deputy director for International Cooperation, National Research South Ural State University
Daniel Brantes Ferreira
PhD, Senior researcher at National Research South Ural State University, CEO of Brazilian Center for Mediation and Arbitration
David Mossop

PhD, Lecturer in Linguistics at the University of Sofia, Academic Editor, New Bulgarian University, Shayametov National State Research Centre Kazakhstan.

Consulting Editor, Academic Writing Office, South Ural State University, Chelyabinsk, Russia, read more

Magnus Gustafsson

Associate professor at Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Learning and Communication, read more

Kelly Metz-Matthews

Faculty in the English as a Second Language (ESL) Department at San

Diego College of Continuing Education,

read more

Svetlana Suchkova
Head of the Office of Academic Development/ Development of Academic Competences Unit at the National Research University

Higher School of Economics,

read more

Natalia Fedorova
Manager at the HSE Academic Writing Center

read more

Olga Kirillova

PhD in Technical Sciences, President of the Association of Scientific Editors and Publishers, Director of the Training and Consulting Center, Nonprofit Partnership National Electronic Information Consortium (NP NEICON), authorized consultant-expert of the Scopus database

Elena Shpit

Associate Professor at the Department of Foreign Languages at Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics (TUSUR), Tomsk, Russia,

read more

Tatiana Alenkina
PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Foreign Languages, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Russia, read more
Natalia Kasatkina

PhD , Director of the Institute of Foreign languages, Head of the Department of Foreign Languages for Humanities, Demidov Yaroslavl State University

Victoria Tevs
Lecturer, Department of Foreign Languages for Humanities, Demidov Yaroslavl State University
Oksana Anossova
PhD in philology, English language and literature. Associate Professor at Foreign Languages Department (FLD) of Engineering Academy (EA) Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), read more
Alexandra Borissova Saleh
PhD, science communication expert, Italy, read more
Olga Pavlova
Assistant of the Department of Foreign Languages, Saint-Petersburg State Institute of Technology, Russia
Michele L. McConnell
Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Director of the Master of Arts in Teaching at Fresno Pacific University, read more
Conference Schedule
OCTOBER 20, 2022 (GMT+3, Moscow)
08:40 – 09:00 Conference Registration / Coffee Chat / Informal Networking
09:00 – 09:10 Welcome Address to Conference Participants
Speaker: Elena Bazanova
President of the Association of Academic Writing Experts “National Writing Centers Consortium”

09:10 – 10:10 Talk: Response to Writing: Theory and Practice
Speaker : Betsy Gilliland
PhD, associate professor in the department of Second Language Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi Mānoa

Quickfire questions
“Response to writing” is often thought of as teachers’ corrections to students’ grammatical errors, written in red pen all over the students’ assignments. Teachers complain about the amount of time and effort they put into correcting their students’ writing, only to see students ignore their corrections and make the same mistakes over and over again. Recent research, however, has identified reasons for this disconnect between teachers’ practice and students’ learning. Alternative approaches allow teachers to save time while increasing their students’ autonomy as writers. This talk will review key concepts in theories behind feedback on writing and introduce findings from recent research on teacher-, peer-, and self-response. I will share best practices for providing written and oral feedback on writing.
10:15 – 10:55 Talk: Academic Writing Instruction for Scholarly Collaboration: Strategies for a Digital Age
Speaker: Kelly Metz-Matthews
PhD candidate, faculty in the English as a Second Language (ESL) Department at San Diego College of Continuing Education

Quickfire questions
This presentation explores the teaching of academic writing for publication in a digital age in which academic collaboration is not merely crucial but increasingly complex. Focusing on how today’s second-language academic writing instruction may require additional insights and strategies outside of traditional explicit writing instruction, the presenter will address how educators might best support and encourage both virtual and in-person writing exchange and progress toward publication and research impact. The presenter will further highlight collaborative tools, techniques, and socialization strategies that may benefit scholars working interculturally, transnationally, and across a variety of disciplines.
11:00 – 11:55 Talk: Principles and Methods of Teaching Academic Science Communication within English Language Courses at Domain Specific Higher Education Institutions
Speaker: Nadežda Stojković
PhD, University of Niš, Faculty of Electronic Engineering, Serbia
Principles and Methods of Teaching Academic Science Communication within English Language Courses

Quickfire questions
This talk will be devoted to giving one possible theoretical framework and practical solutions for the given topic relating to academic science communication with respect to the particularities of its multidisciplinarity and multiculturality. The central thesis is that while admittedly most faculties curricula rarely include specified courses on preparing students for communicating in a scientific community, this identified lack in educating students to be well rounded professionals and scientists who not only possess domain knowledge but are well versed in modes of its successful transfer and dissemination, can and should be resolved in the syllabi of (English) language courses so as to include teaching science communication in its linguistic form, since linguistic communication per se inherently belongs to the course of language. Thus, we will argue that these courses at tertiary level of education have the potential of being indespensable for the success of the educational outcome.

We will identify two primary theoretical arguments supporting this claim.  Firstly, higher education English language courses focus on English for the major domain studies at the designated instution, therefore utilizing the English for Specific Purposes (ESP) approach, meaning that the content of the course reflects the linguistic characteristics of the domain discourse of the faculty major. ESP aspect introduces domain lexis, register, discourse, as needed for the professional orientation. Secondly and equally relevantly, students are also to be made cognizant that the channel of communicating and spreading new scientific findings and novel professional solutions requires full awareness and application of academic rhetoric, thius expanding the ESP into English for Specific Academic Purposes (ESAP) courses. ESAP enables students to actively take part in scientific research and its dissemination as knowing the forms and features of the communicative activities of their target disciplines.

To illustrate practical, in-class implementation of the thesis, particular practice examples will be offered on teaching rhetorical structures representative of academic science communication with the rationale of how they can serve as nucleus pieces for further independent students’ learning. Focus will also be on teaching sources for vocabulary, discourse, markers, then students’ application of discourse analysis. We shall emphasize social and strategic meta cognitive skills that accompany this practice and the need to make students aware and reflective of those while studying. Solutions as to how to introduce students to presenting their academic language skills in a multidisciplinary and multicultural environment environment will be suggested.
12:00 – 12:25 Talk: Why communicate science
Speaker: Alexandra Borissova Saleh
PhD, science communication expert, Italy

Quickfire questions
Dr. Alexandra Borissova Saleh will share her experience as a physical chemist, then journalist and a social researcher on how and why scientists communicate their work and how it can be useful for academy, public and themselves.
12:30 – 13:00 Talk: Institutional Instruments of Supporting Academics' Publication Activity
Speaker: Svetlana Suchkova
PhD, associate professor, Vice-President the Association of Academic Writing Experts “National Writing Centers Consortium”, Director of HSE Academic Writing Center, Russia

Quickfire questions
The presentation will raise an issue of how the university can create a conducive environment for both research and communication its results to the global academic community. The presenter will share the findings of the study on the attitude to English in academia. She will also describe the support services the university provides, using the case of the Higher School of Economics, Moscow. The question Why does the university need a writing center? will be answered, too.
13:00 – 14:00 LUNCH
14:00 – 14:25 Talk: Research Writing Instruction: Enhancing “Bottom-Up” Approach
Speaker: Elena Shpit
Associate professor at Department of Foreign Languages, Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics (TUSUR), Tomsk, Russia

Quickfire questions
Research writing is a higher level of academic writing and is aimed at writing research papers for publication in peer-reviewed international journals. This fact emphasizes the need for the papers to meet the norms and expectations of a discourse community. This paper presents the first experience in using the results of the research that computationally identified some distinct features of student writing against the writing of international members of a disciplinary discourse community. The results of this ‘bottom-up’ corpus analysis were used to develop complementary teaching materials for the writing instruction course with postgraduate engineering students. More specifically, we added such chapters as Sentence Length, Nominalization, Prepositions and Prepositional Phrases, Restricted and Non-Restricted Relative Clauses, Passive at the End of the Sentences, and Cohesion. Each chapter was supported by the research results and real examples. The instruction was conducted on a bilingual approach and lasted for 26 academic hours. As a result, students demonstrated an increase in the level of motivation and awareness of target aspects. However, to achieve the level of expertise in practical application of the acquired knowledge, the instruction should be systematic and more long-continued.



14:30 – 15:00 Talk: Subtleties of Style and Grammar in Russian-English Translations of Academic Texts Through the Prism of a Native Speaker of British English
Speaker: David Mossop
BA MA PhD MCIOL CL, lecturer in Linguistics at the University of Sofia, Sofia

Quickfire questions
Based on a broad sample of academic texts translated from Russian into English in a variety of sectors from Philosophy to Cardiology, Electronics and Mining, the presentation will aim to summarise some of the most commonly encountered characteristics of non-native Russian - English translators and writers. It will then attempt to make recommendations aimed at enhancing the English style, grammar and other linguistic features of the text, in order to harmonise the final product with comparable texts written and published by English native speaker academics. Attention will be paid to textual features of word order, sentence length, paragraph breaks and punctuation.


15:05 – 16:05 Talk: Responding to the Changing Landscape of Graduate Student Writing
Speaker: Christine Feak
PhD, English Language Institute, University of Michigan, USA

Quickfire questions
The academic writing challenges faced by the new generation of graduate students are becoming more complex. It is no longer enough for them to master traditional research genres such as literature reviews and journal articles; graduate students must also now master new forms of these genres as well as new genres that are increasingly multi-modal. In the case of research articles, for instance, many journals are requiring new types of abstracts that involve animation or a short author presentation (video abstracts). Authors are also being expected to produce written texts that can be understood by non-experts within and outside the academy. In short, graduate students are being asked to navigate new rules of research dissemination that require an enhanced set of knowledge brokering skills and a broader genre repertoire that will allow them to transport their research and expertise across many boundaries. This talk will explore the changing landscape of research writing and ways that English for Academic Purposes writing programs can respond through new course offerings that can help students to develop writing agility.
16:10– 17:40 Workshop: Giving Feedback that Actually Makes a Difference for Research Writing
Speaker: Christine Feak
PhD, English Language Institute, University of Michigan, USA

We usually know good research writing when we see it. Skillful research writers understand their readers, guiding them through their texts so that their intended meaning is clear, and reading is almost effortless. How do they do this? We may think that clarity is largely a matter of grammatical accuracy, but this is not enough to produce a well-written paper. Drawing on research on scientific writing, this interactive workshop will focus on language and rhetorical strategies that are used by successful authors to guide readers through a text, to ensure that the logic is clear, and to meet reader expectations. These aspects of research writing will be brought to light through analysis and discussion of excerpts from published papers. 

Workshop participants are encouraged to have a paper available so they can apply what is discussed.

In this workshop participants will learn to:

  • analyze papers to determine how authors use language and rhetorical strategies to guide readers through a text
  • adjust their reading lens from one of grammatical accuracy to one that considers how well a text meets readers’ expectations in terms of information flow and rhetoric
  • provide feedback that can make a meaningful difference on the clarity and information flow of a text and on an author’s ability to self-edit their writing
17:40 – 18:40 Talk: Promises and Perils of English as a Lingua Franca in Teaching Academic Writing
Speaker: Angela M. Dadak
PhD, MATESOL, Instructor and International Student Coordinator Writing Studies Program, American University, Washington, DC, USA
English as a global language for scientific and academic communication has allowed scholarship to be shared and read by audiences worldwide. It has been said that English is now a language that belongs to all world users, not just its native speakers. However, the push to learn, write, and publish global scholarship can overrun complicated questions about what is “correct” English, how much variation is acceptable, how publishers influence those decisions, whose voices are elevated, whose voices are silenced, and – as a result – what knowledge is being lost. This talk will discuss those complications and consider them in light of teaching English for academic writing and publication. Specifically, the talk centers on how to balance an understanding of the complexity of English as a language of global scholarship while preparing scholars to work in English to share their knowledge with the world.
OCTOBER 21, 2022
(GMT+3, Moscow)
09:00 – 10:30 Workshop: Response to Writing: Supporting Student Learning
Speaker: Betsy Gilliland
PhD, associate professor in the department of Second Language Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi Mānoa

Quickfire questions

Writing teachers and teachers who include written assignments often complain about the amount of time and energy they put into commenting on their students’ texts, only to see the students ignore their comments in subsequent drafts. In this workshop, we will examine some of the reasons why common teacher response practices are less effective and then explore alternative approaches that reduce teachers’ efforts while increasing students’ learning. Drawing on recent research into response to writing, participants will develop strategies for structuring writing assignments and lessons to put these best practices into use.

This workshop is primarily intended for teachers of undergraduate writers, but concepts will also be applicable for writing center tutors and instructors of graduate students.

Participants will learn how to:
  • Prioritize feedback for efficiency and effectiveness
  • Integrate peer- and self-response into their teaching
  • Design writing assignments that scaffold students’ writing and reduce the need for teacher feedback
10:30 – 11:10 Talk: Academic Writing Across Languages: Conciseness, Brevity, and Accuracy
Speaker: Irina Korotkina
PhD (Doctor of Education), Director of Academic Writing and Communication Center, RANEPA; Dean of Interdisciplinary Department of English, Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences; Professor of Global Education Department, Institute for Strategy of Education Development of the Russian Academy of Education.

Quickfire questions
Writing is still strongly associated with national languages and traditions, although the biggest share of an author's work is to produce new knowledge and present it according to the internationally accepted rhetorical conventions. Out of the five stages of classical rhetoric - and certainly, today's scholarly rhetoric - four have virtually nothing to do with language. Invention and arrangement are not yet writing but meta competencies, and style implies rather understanding genre or disciplinary differences rather than language. It is therefore only at the stage of presentation that we have to apply the lexis, syntax, and grammar of a particular language. But how particular are the differences between, say, English and Russian in an academic text? During the workshop, we will find out that there are none if any differences between the two when academic writing is concerned.

11:15 – 11:45 Talk: Teaching Research Writing and Speaking to International Master’s Students
Speaker: Evgenia Khabirova
Candidate of Science in Philology. Head of the Academic Writing Office, Associate Professor at the Department of Foreign Languages, South Ural State University

Quickfire questions
The presentation focuses on the methods of teaching research writing and speaking to future philologists in the process of preparing a master's thesis in English. The electronic course "Successful Strategies for Thesis Writing" is offered to NNSE students as an auxiliary self-study resource. The course is aimed to provide students with useful information on the stages of writing a master's thesis, paper design requirements, academic writing style, research analysis, and methods of presenting the results. Each section contains a follow-up task. The presentation emphasizes the importance of a systematic approach to the development of academic literacy of master’s students.
11:50 – 12:20 Talk: Publishing in English as a Non-Native Speaker
Speaker: Amanda Wegner
PhD student, proofreader in the Academic Writing Office, South Ural State University

Quickfire questions
The South Ural State University Academic Writing Office has been assisting university staff and postgraduates for 6 years. We have worked with professionals and postgraduate students with various levels of English proficiency to help them publish within and outside of Russia. Although the clients vary greatly, there are certain mistakes we see time and again from both proficient authors and young researchers. Some of these mistakes are related to specific practices in Russian academic writing, while others are simply a result of being a non-native speaker. I will discuss the most common errors and misconceptions that we see from our clients and provide some tips on how non-native speakers can improve their texts.
12:25 – 12:55 Talk: Catering to Academics’ Needs: Writing Center-Based Research
Speaker: Natalia Fedorova
Manager at the HSE Academic Writing Center

Quickfire questions
Every educator has to target course content and materials at the learners he/she is working with. An effective way to cater to learners’ needs is to design course syllabi and materials based on research and student profiling. At the HSE Academic Writing Center (AWC), we work with researchers and faculty members and have to consider academics’ special educational needs. This is a target audience characterized by abundant learning experience and a high level of autonomy. I would like to give an overview of various surveys regularly carried out by the AWC team and focus on a survey on academics’ autonomy as regards writing in English. The rationale for the survey was to identify aspects of writing which pose a challenge and in which academics need assistance. 118 faculty members, who had previously attended workshops and courses at the AWC, completed an online questionnaire. They self-evaluated their level of English proficiency, their independence in writing, and various writing and learning skills. The findings confirmed that academics indeed are highly autonomous in writing. However, they also revealed that academics are not confident of being able to work on specific writing skills without guidance. The study results added to our understanding of target learners’ needs and provided a foundation for developing scaffolded self-study materials that would allow learners to master strategies and hone essential skills in research writing independently. During the talk, I will outline the study’s findings, demonstrate how these findings were reflected in the self-study materials we created, and share the feedback on the materials we received from our clients. I would like to invite colleagues to reflect on the benefits and challenges of designing materials to meet learners’ special needs and discuss approaches to encouraging autonomous learning.
13:00 – 14:00 LUNCH

14:00 – 15:00 Workshop: Academic Writing for Scientific Journals in the Field of English Language and Linguistics

Speaker: Nadežda Stojković

Quickfire questions
Exchange of scientific findings, solutions, newly detected issues of relevance, best practices, are to the largest degree communicated through scientific journals. Inherent to the nature of all scientific fields is clear, concise formulation of thesis and supportive argumentative rhetoric of established layout. An expert in the field is first recognized if applying these features in their scientific presentation. If that is in place, actual content is then examined. In order to succeed in communicating their knowledge, prospective authors need to be aware of the many specifics of scrutiny of academic community and to be prepared to adequately respond.
This workshop offers a practical guide on how to formulate and structure a scientific paper proposal in the field of English language and linguistics, how to choose a suitable journal which to approach, understanding its editorial policy and submission requirements, indexing, citations, what to expect of the editorial and review assessment, identifying relevant scientific journals databases, categorization of papers, trends in research. The method to be applied in this workshop will be extensively collaborative, with the aim to enable colleagues to independently prepare a well written, well structured manuscript, submit it to a relevant journal and successfully respond to editorial requirements.
15:00-15:35 Talk: Scientific Communication: the term delineated and applied
Speaker: Oksana Anosova
PhD in Philology, English language and literature; Associate Professor at Foreign Languages Department (FLD) of Engineering Academy (EA) Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (RUDN University), Russia

Quickfire questions
The semantic and metasemiotic incongruence of Scientific Communication still causes uncertainties and hesitation while interpreting the concept. It could be treated in a broad and narrow sense. It could be accepted and promoted by scientists at large and rejected by the expert community. To begin with the term definition one should decide if it is a Science Communication or the Scientific Communication and if the difference comprehensible or comprehensive. The next step should consider the realm of sciences involved into the communication process whether it should be considered, bordered with or isolated from the scientifically neglected Humanities. Next, the specificity of Communication as a term should be discussed with the sequence of communicative skills, genres, features, parameters and activities regarded by intercultural communication and partially embedded into the scientific one, as well as purely scientific phenomena on the communicative side should be discussed. One more debatable point refers to the limits or heights and depths of the scientific research results to be shared and related to the non-professional community. Hence, another problem arises, the audience and the purpose, the subject and the tools of the communication, if it is always an approximation or the question of agreement about some average simplification or modest complexity verbal and non-verbal, shown in schemata, pictured and explained visually. On the top of the questions, there are areas that Scientific Communication should serve, meet the expectations and avoid suspicion and accusation of incompetence and profanation. The mediators or intermediaries from and to science domains, the guides and pilots shedding the light and leading the way to the sphere of recent discoveries and inventions, the illuminators or enlighteners of the terminologically complicated and symbolically and numerically expressed ideas could hardly inspire or merely enrol the adherents to the borders or into the core of scientific research per se. Scientific communication is about expertise shared with the enquiring minds by means of universal approaches and tools; although, the tinier is a step into the scientific research, the less indicative is the communication about the scientific achievements and vice versa. The semantics should scrutinise the terms and their contents intelligibly. The metasemiotics is understood and shared in its trichotomic unity – the icon, index and symbol. The semantics of the term is to discuss the science broadly by means of words, the metasemiotics is the tool when it is grasped by the creative mind of the communicator and rendered to the potentially creative and scientifically responsive minds. The semantics of the term is a present day, and metasemiotically it is about future.

15:40-16:05 Talk: International Research Group as a Mean of Scientific Collaboration and Communication
Speaker: Elizaveta A. Gromova
PhD in law, Deputy Director for International Cooperation, National Research South Ural State University, Russia

Speaker: Daniel Brantes Ferreira
PhD, senior researcher at National Research South Ural State University, CEO of Brazilian Center for Mediation and Arbitration
One of the tasks of modern universities is to provide students with the opportunities to build successful international career. For this they should create suitable environment and internationalise students by strengthening their English and giving them useful foreign academic contacts. The Research Group “Law, Digital Technologies & ADR: international and comparative perspective” was launched in 2021 with the main aim – to create an international students’ virtual hub for the research and cross-cultural collaboration. To provide students with the opportunity to compare jurisdictions and regulatory approaches of different countries P2P approach was chosen. Working in pairs under the supervision gives the opportunity to get the experience of the teamwork. The Research Group was registered in CNPq Brazil and co-hosted by Ambra University (USA), Universidade Candido Mendes (Brazil) and South Ural State University (Russia). The group unites young and experienced researchers from 7 countries (Brazil, USA, Russia, Italy, India, Portugal and Uganda), and 15 universities.
We are going to talk about the idea of creating this group, activities within it, as well as advantages of this kind of education and problems we faced to make it work.

16:10 – 17:40 Workshop: Raising Critical Language Awareness in an EAP Writing Class: Benefits and Techniques
Speaker: Angela M. Dadak
PhD, MATESOL, Instructor and International Student Coordinator Writing Studies Program, American University, Washington, DC, USA

Quickfire questions

Critical language awareness (CLA) refers to understanding connections between language, society, and power. For international scholars writing in English, CLA involves questions such as what does it mean to “sound native” and to what degree is that necessary? How does publishing in English elevate certain voices and silence others? How can it be possible to write in a language other than English while still reaching a global audience? Those who prepare scholars to participate globally in English may question the viability of including CLA in academic writing courses, which already lack space for all the material one would ideally like to cover. This workshop will outline the benefits raising academic writers’ CLA about global academic English, present activities and techniques for doing so in an academic writing class, and invite consideration for larger course revisions.
Participants are encouraged to bring a course syllabus to the workshop to apply the activities.
In this workshop, participants will learn to:
  • recognize effects of raising English academic writers’ understanding of the complicated position of English as a global language of scholarship
  • incorporate CLA features into existing writing course syllabi and practices
  • include activities such as self-reflection to raise students, language awareness and language confidence
OCTOBER 22, 2022
(GMT+3, Moscow)
10:00 – 10:50 Talk: How Might Educators Spark Students’ Interest in Writing and Develop Their Skills by Deploying New Classroom Technologies, Strategies, and Knowledge
Speaker: Natalia Kasatkina
PhD, Director of the Institute of Foreign Languages, Head of the Department of Foreign Languages for Humanities, Demidov Yaroslavl State University, Rassia
Speaker: Victoria Tevs
Lecturer, Department of Foreign Languages for Humanities, Yaroslavl, Russia

Quickfire questions
Based on a theoretical framework, the conference paper shines a spotlight on various techniques, strategies, and knowledge educators might use with a view to enhancing their students` writing skills and fostering their love of the process. The presentation of different teaching materials and resources aims to show how teachers can incorporate them into the educational process and use them to the benefit of their students.
Thus, the conference paper might be relevant and significant to the potential audience.
11:00-11:30 Talk: The Genre of a Grant Proposal in the Modern Teaching Context: Challenges and Opportunities
Speaker: Tatiana Alenkina
PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Foreign Languages, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology

Quickfire questions
In the modern context of science communication, applying for a grant is an essential practice for every researcher. For an early-career researcher, knowing the structure of a grant proposal opens up opportunities of science communication in the wide sense of the word. Focusing on the importance of grant writing for Ph.D. students, a grant proposal allows students to know the practices of applying to international research grants as well as to acquire the essential skills of composing key texts (micro-genres), and, as a result, developing their digital literacy. The course "Grant Writing" is an ideal example of a genre-based course. In the modern scholarly tradition, a genre is considered to be a "frame for social action" (Bazerman, 1997,p. 19). Under modern political conditions, international research grants seem to be losing popularity among Russian Ph.D. students. However, the course has its great potential as a genre-based course that combines different perspectives:
1. The course is a genre-based course that develops intertextuality and interdiscursivity (scientific, business, academic discourses) along with multimodality. The course is aimed at combining text-based and process-based approaches with planning as a key skill developed;
2. The course can be seen as a science communication course. It provides the rhetorical awareness awareness of students, foregrounding the narrative elements of all sections of the proposal (telling a "story");
3. The course fosters digital literacy: searching for a funder, looking for sources, integrating sources in the literature review, collaborating with the principal investigator and colleagues, using digital resources for joint research.  
11:35-11:55 Talk: Issues of Using Multifunctional Reading in the Teaching of Academic Writing
Speaker: Olga Pavlova
Assistant of the Department of Foreign Languages, Saint-Petersburg State Institute of Technology, Russia

Quickfire questions
Academic writing (AW) is an essential part of the higher education paradigm. More recently it has been recognised as an essential part of foreign language instruction in undergraduate education regardless of students’ major. Teaching AW requires developing reading, cognitive and study skills.Teaching these skills in a foreign language course to first-year students may better prepare them to read complex texts and write in their major.
I propose that the central component of teaching AW is multifunctional reading, which I define as using texts as a tool to achieve different goals in teaching AW. Thus reading can be used to give learners an example of a genre while it can also be a source for summarising information and for getting more knowledge about a paragraph structure, cohesion and coherence of the whole text.
In this presentation, I will discuss how I apply the concept of multifunctional reading in my practice of teaching AW. Specifically, I will talk about my experience of teaching reading, cognitive and study skills to a group of first-year students majoring in economics. I will also share students’ feedback about their learning to read and write in new ways. Participants will be introduced to multifunctional reading activities that can be applied to teaching students of other majors and at the undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate levels.
12:00 – 14:00 Talk: International Scientometric Database Scopus as a Source of Scientific Information, Evaluation, and Selection of Major Journals for Publication
Speaker: Olga Kirillova
PhD in Technical Sciences, President of the Association of Scientific Editors and Publishers, Director of the Training and Consulting Center, Nonprofit Partnership National Electronic Information Consortium (NP NEICON), authorized consultant-expert of the Scopus database

Quickfire questions
14:00 – 14:30 Talk: English for higher education and research purposes – whose English in a translingual world
Speaker: Magnus Gustafson
Associate professor at Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Learning and Communication



14:35 – 15:00 Talk: Interactive Feedback Cycles: Acculturating Graduate Students into Academic Writing
Speaker: Michele L. McConnell
Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Director of the Master of Arts in Teaching at Fresno Pacific University
Conference news